No Secret Disciples/Academy Chorus

April10AM2011

Sunday morning^

Mike, our pulpit minister has been preaching about the life of Jesus from the Gospels for well over two years now–it has been a wonderful series. Today the scripture text was from John 19 and Mark 15, concerning Joseph of Arimathea and Nicodemus, two members of the Sanhedrin, who come asking Pilate for the body of Jesus, after his death on the cross. We don’t know much about Joseph, but the Gospel of John gives us a bit of information on Nicodemus and how he originally came to Jesus at night. He later defends Jesus (sort of) when the ruling council wanted to bring Jesus in for his teachings (John 7), to the point that both men risk the wrath of their own professional associations, to give the Christ a proper burial. You cannot be a secret disciple of Jesus.



April10PM2011

Sunday evening^

You may or may not have noticed, but these two sets of notes are in pencil. Generally, I do not care for pencil/graphite drawings in my sketchbooks because it smears so badly. But my pen ran out of ink and I resorted to the golf pencils that are kept in the pews next to the attendance cards. They do give a nice variety of gray tones not possible with ink pens, but I’ll be back to cross hatching next week.

The second drawing isn’t technically sermon notes. This past Sunday evening, the Harding Academy Chorus came and sang for us. Give me Jesus was one of the songs they performed. It inspired me. Music, art and literature are three wondrous gifts that God has given humanity.

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Loved Much/Forgiven Much

LovedMuchForgivenMuch

Luke 7:36-50 (NIV)

Now one of the Pharisees invited Jesus to have dinner with him, so he went to the Pharisee’s house and reclined at the table. When a woman who had lived a sinful life in that town learned that Jesus was eating at the Pharisee’s house, she brought an alabaster jar of perfume, and as she stood behind him at his feet weeping, she began to wet his feet with her tears. Then she wiped them with her hair, kissed them and poured perfume on them.

When the Pharisee who had invited him saw this, he said to himself, If this man were a prophet, he would know who is touching him and what kind of woman she is–that she is a sinner.

Jesus answered him, Simon, I have something to tell you.

Tell me, teacher, he said.

Two men owed money to a certain moneylender. One owed him five hundred denarii, and the other fifty. Neither of them had the money to pay him back, so he canceled the debts of both. Now which of them will love him more?

Simon replied, I suppose the one who had the bigger debt canceled.

You have judged correctly, Jesus said.

Then he turned toward the woman and said to Simon, Do you see this woman? I came into your house. You did not give me any water for my feet, but she wet my feet with her tears and wiped them with her hair. You did not give me a kiss, but this woman, from the time I entered, has not stopped kissing my feet. You did not put oil on my head, but she has poured perfume on my feet. Therefore, I tell you, her many sins have been forgiven–for she loved much. But he who has been forgiven little loves little.

The other guests began to say among themselves, Who is this who even forgives sins?

Jesus said to the woman, Your faith has saved you; go in peace.
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Sermon Notes- a new series

March27AM2011
Sunday, March 27, 2011 AM services.
Two Thieves Separated By a Cross

Since I have drawn in Church my whole life. I thought I would start posting the notes that I take during sermons. There are usually two per week, but if I am not feeling inspired (or preaching myself) then that one will be missing. My plans are to keep my comments to a minimum and just let you see the work. I limit myself to the time the sermon is actually being preached. Once it is over, I stop drawing.

March27PM2011
Sunday, March 27, 2011, PM service
Contemplating Our Life After Dead

April3AM2011
Sunday, April 4, 2011, AM services.
Atonement

I must say a little about this one. Mike Ireland is our pulpit minister and he discussed these common theories on “atonement.” All of them have something good–none of them are perfectly complete, because God’s atonement through Jesus the Christ is too vast for us to comprehend totally. That is why the drawing begins with the word bursting out of the limits of the page.

April3PM2011
Sunday, April 4, 2011, PM services
Living Like it Happened
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